Vaping law causes controversy among students

Following+a+federal+ban+on+kid-friendly+vape+juice+flavors+such+as+mint+and+fruit%2C+PA+passed+Act+93.
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Vaping law causes controversy among students

Following a federal ban on kid-friendly vape juice flavors such as mint and fruit, PA passed Act 93.

Following a federal ban on kid-friendly vape juice flavors such as mint and fruit, PA passed Act 93.

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Following a federal ban on kid-friendly vape juice flavors such as mint and fruit, PA passed Act 93.

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Following a federal ban on kid-friendly vape juice flavors such as mint and fruit, PA passed Act 93.

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On November 19, 2019,  a new bill was passed regarding vaping, causing some controversy among the BASH student body. This bill states anyone possessing or using a vaping product in a school, in a school bus or vehicle, or on school property is committing a summary offense.

So, what will this mean for students? A summary offense is basically the most minor criminal offense issued in Pennsylvania – it’s usually for a common law broken, and the person can be charged without right to a jury or trial. It still goes on your permanent criminal record, however, and in this case there will most likely be an additional fine added, along with the school’s policy of a $50 school fine and $10 per test kit used to check for other substances. If these obligations are not met, privileges such as open campus, parking passes, and dances will be compromised. Though it’s not a huge change to the school’s previous policy, it is still very important both students and parents understand what exactly this law means. 

When it comes to the students, there are mixed opinions about this law being necessary in the school. Many students feel it’s an excellent idea.

“I think it’s a good idea. I mean, if it stops people from vaping, then why not?” Freshman Olivia Caprio states.

The goal is, of course, to try and bring down the number of underage students vaping. In theory, it should work; no one wants something like this on their criminal record, or to pay the large fine.

However, there are many students who feel the law is pointless. They don’t see how it will stop kids from vaping: if they didn’t care then, why should they care now? They feel that since previous attempts to lower the amount of vaping in the building didn’t work, then this won’t either. It’s just another fine to add.

Who knows if this law will help lower the number of vapers in the long run. Regardless, this new bill seems like a step in the right direction to bring down the number of student vaping.